RelativeDateTimeFormatter

Creates a textual representation of the amount of time between two dates.

The relative date formatter takes two dates as input and creates a textual representation that communicates the relative time between the two dates, e.g. "yesterday" and "in 1 week".

locale

Locale to use when formatting.

The locale should be specified using a string identifier, e.g. "en", "it" or "da". When no locale is set, the formatter will use the current locale of the device.

locale: string

-new RelativeDateTimeFormatter

Constructs a relative date and time formatter.

new RelativeDateTimeFormatter()

The formatter creates a textual representation of the time between two points in time.


-string

Creates a localized string communicating the amount of time between two dates.

string(date: Date, referenceDate: Date): string

Creates a localized textual representation of the amount of time between to dates. If the two dates are the same, the function will return "now". If the reference date is yesterday, the function will return "yesterday". Other examples include "in 10 seconds", "2 hours ago", "last week" and "next year".

Parameters

date
Date
The date to create a relative date and time for.

referenceDate
Date
The reference date that date is relative to.

Return value

string
A textual representation of the amount of time between the two dates.


-useNamedDateTimeStyle

Prefers named dates and times.

useNamedDateTimeStyle()

When using the named style, the formatter tries to find a suitable textual representation over a numeric value for the relative time, e.g. "now" instead of "in 0 seconds" and "yesterday" instead of "1 day ago".

When no named representation is found the formatter will fallback to using the numeric style.


-useNumericDateTimeStyle

Prefers numeric dates and times.

useNumericDateTimeStyle()

When using the numeric style, the formatter will always prefer numeric representations over named representations. E.g. it will return "in 0 seconds" instead of "now" and "1 day ago" instead of "yesteday".